Archive for June 27, 2013

Are your tasks leading to an effective organization?

Have you heard the story about the firm who prided themselves on a very efficient process for ordering supplies? Yet, that same firm had backlogs, unhappy customers, and disgruntled employees.

They had missed the importance of ensuring that the tasks they perform resulted in measurable effectiveness, as we discussed in our most recent newsletter.

Performing specific tasks in an efficient manner does not necessarily ensure an effective organization. Until an organization understands what makes their processes effective, then being efficient may not actually reap the results desired.

Peter Drucker said it well: “Efficiency is doing things right; effectiveness is doing the right things.”

In our next blog, we will discuss some hints to consider when evaluating your firm’s effectiveness. Also, be sure to sign up for our newsletter on the right-hand side of our blog’s home page.

Contact Charlene Aldridge at 972.447.9787 or CharleneAldridge@aldridgekerr.com to discuss how we can assist you in more clearly defining your organization’s effectiveness.

Three Reasons to Know Your Critical Processes

Our previous blogs on the topic of knowing your critical processes provided some hints on how to determine which of your processes should be defined as “critical” and discussed who should be involved in identifying them.

In our newsletter on this topic, we provided a list of why it is important to identify your most Critical Processes. Let’s now look in more detail at some of those reasons.

When Aldridge Kerr is asked to assist its Clients with a wide variety of operational consulting projects, we often recommend the first step is to identify their Critical Processes. That identification can be the foundation for:

1. Assessing the effectiveness and/or efficiency of the organization.

  • Establishing Best Practices, internal controls, and business metrics should be focused on the identified Critical Processes in order to realize effectiveness within an organization most quickly.

2. Documenting an organization’s processes, which may be needed:

  • For a forthcoming audit by either a Regulatory Agency or an internal/external audit.
    • By identifying which processes are most critical and will be documented first, the organization is better positioned to ensure a positive outcome from the audit.
  • For training and/or reference of newly enhanced processes.

3. Performing a Business Impact Analysis.

  • This can be especially valuable if a Business Continuity Plan needs to be built or updated.

And, as we mentioned in our newsletter, there is a wealth of benefits to knowing your Critical Processes. This effort positions your organization for sustainability, rapid growth, and opportunities.

Look for our next newsletter soon. We will be discussing why efficiency must align with effectiveness. Also, be sure to sign up for our newsletter on the right-hand side of our blog’s home page.

Aldridge Kerr can assist you in more clearly defining your critical processes. Contact Charlene Aldridge at 972.447.9787 or CharleneAldridge@aldridgekerr.com to discuss how we can assist you.

Who should be involved with identifying your Critical Processes?

Have you read our most recent newsletter on the importance of knowing your critical processes?

Our previous blog on this topic provided some hints on how to determine which of your processes should be defined as “critical.”

So now, we will continue our discussions on this topic by providing some thoughts on who should be involved in the identification of your critical processes:

1. Each Functional Area should be included in this assessment.

Examples: Accounting, Compliance, Finance, Human Resources, Information Technology, Legal Marketing, Operations, Sales. It is important that every Functional Area participate in this assessment so there is an Enterprise view of all critical processes.

2. Each Functional Area should ensure that all processes are considered in the assessment, even those performed only by one individual or performed only occasionally.

3. Management must be involved with evaluating the universe of processes identified and consider the factors outlined within our last blog.

4. Although the Executive Team will drive the strategy and mission of the organization, it should be the role of each Functional Area’s Management Team to assess what processes within their areas need to be defined as “critical.”

5. Identifying the critical processes must be a collaborative effort between those performing the tasks, Functional Area Management, and the Executive Team.

In our next blog, we will expand upon the importance of identifying your most critical processes. Also, be sure to sign up for our newsletter on the right-hand side of our blog’s home page.

Aldridge Kerr can assist you in more clearly defining your critical processes. Contact Charlene Aldridge at 972.447.9787 or CharleneAldridge@aldridgekerr.com to discuss how we can assist you.